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Goldsmiths
CCA

Events

Detail from Jim Falconer, Untitled, 1966, © the artist. Collection Gladys Nilsson and Jim Nutt. Photo by William H. Bengtson M.

Detail from Jim Falconer, Untitled, 1966, © the artist. Collection Gladys Nilsson and Jim Nutt. Photo by William H. Bengtson M.

WITH: Rose Dagul (Musician / Lecturer in Popular Music, Goldsmiths), Haseeb Iqbal (Poet / DJ) and Ifeoma Orjiekwe (Artist).

In this collective listening session, experience an anecdotal retelling of How Chicago! Imagists 1960s & 70s through sound and storytelling, shaped by the musical choices of Rose Dagul, Haseeb Iqbal and Ifeoma Orjiekwe. Each has compiled a set of tracks, presented as an ‘audio tour’. Together these form personal responses to the art works on show in the exhibition, used to explore thematics of humour, vernacular culture, friendship and collaboration that run throughout the Imagists’ oeuvre.

Biographies

Rose Dagul’s interest lies in making processes visible, including the realms of practice, experimentation, imperfection, repetition or the unfinished. Dagul is and artist, lecturer in Popular Music at Goldsmiths, and co-founder of DIY platform The Surround. Under the moniker Rhosyn she is a multi-instrumentalist performer/songwriter and she is a cellist and composer for the Peckham Chamber Orchestra, a collectively run community orchestra of predominantly strings and woodwind instruments.

Haseeb Iqbal is a spoken word poet, podcast host and DJ. He has performed at the likes of Brainchild Festival, the Roundhouse and the ICA. He has a weekly residency on Goldsmiths’ Wired Radio as well as having done many shows on NTS, Balamii and Netil, and also hosts the recently-launched Mare Street Records – a DIY podcast platform documenting the thriving London jazz and creative scene.

Ifeoma Orjiekwe is an artist who works primarily with drawing and collage, often inspired by fabric designs and the art from Benin or Nigeria. Frequently combining colour and energetic patterns, Orjiekwe describes her works as “rich and juicy”. Since September 2012 she has been working with disability arts charity Heart n Soul, based in Deptford. With Heart n Soul and artist Ben Connors she created a pop-up studio/workshop called Agozie Art (meaning ‘blessed art’ in Ibo), which travelled to the Southbank Centre, the British Museum and Tate Britain.

The event is free, but booking is highly recommended via the ticket link below.

WITH: Rose Dagul (Musician / Lecturer in Popular Music, Goldsmiths), Haseeb Iqbal (Poet / DJ) and Ifeoma Orjiekwe (Artist).

In this collective listening session, experience an anecdotal retelling of How Chicago! Imagists 1960s & 70s through sound and storytelling, shaped by the musical choices of Rose Dagul, Haseeb Iqbal and Ifeoma Orjiekwe. Each has compiled a set of tracks, presented as an ‘audio tour’. Together these form personal responses to the art works on show in the exhibition, used to explore thematics of humour, vernacular culture, friendship and collaboration that run throughout the Imagists’ oeuvre.

Biographies

Rose Dagul’s interest lies in making processes visible, including the realms of practice, experimentation, imperfection, repetition or the unfinished. Dagul is and artist, lecturer in Popular Music at Goldsmiths, and co-founder of DIY platform The Surround. Under the moniker Rhosyn she is a multi-instrumentalist performer/songwriter and she is a cellist and composer for the Peckham Chamber Orchestra, a collectively run community orchestra of predominantly strings and woodwind instruments.

Haseeb Iqbal is a spoken word poet, podcast host and DJ. He has performed at the likes of Brainchild Festival, the Roundhouse and the ICA. He has a weekly residency on Goldsmiths’ Wired Radio as well as having done many shows on NTS, Balamii and Netil, and also hosts the recently-launched Mare Street Records – a DIY podcast platform documenting the thriving London jazz and creative scene.

Ifeoma Orjiekwe is an artist who works primarily with drawing and collage, often inspired by fabric designs and the art from Benin or Nigeria. Frequently combining colour and energetic patterns, Orjiekwe describes her works as “rich and juicy”. Since September 2012 she has been working with disability arts charity Heart n Soul, based in Deptford. With Heart n Soul and artist Ben Connors she created a pop-up studio/workshop called Agozie Art (meaning ‘blessed art’ in Ibo), which travelled to the Southbank Centre, the British Museum and Tate Britain.

The event is free, but booking is highly recommended via the ticket link below.

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